VMware ESXi Cookbook | Book Review

Disclaimer: I was recently approached by a representative of Packt Publishing and was asked to review a copy of this book. I therefore received an ebook for review.0068EN_VMware ESXi 5

I was a bit dubious about this book  when I read the overview on the Pack Publishing Website, the website quotes

  • Understand the concepts of virtualization by deploying vSphere web client to perform vSphere Administration
  • Learn important aspects of vSphere including administration, security, performance, and configuring vSphere Management Assistant (VMA) to run commands and scripts without the need to authenticate every attempt
  • VMware ESXi 5.1 Cookbook is a recipe-based guide to the administration of VMware vSphere

I’ve been working with VMware products for a number of years now and this book looked like a beginners guide. I was also a little disappointed that the book was based on vSphere 5.1 and not the most current release vSphere 5.5 even though the current release of vSphere was out 6 months before the book.

Who is the book for?

The book is primarily written for technical professionals with system administration skills and basic knowledge of virtualization who wish to learn installation, configuration, and administration of vSphere 5.1. Essential virtualization and ESX or ESXi knowledge is advantageous.

I personally would say it was for people who were new to Virtualization or deploying VMware vSphere products for the first time. Perhaps even a useful resource for management or project management who want to delve a little deeper into the technology. Virtualization concepts would be advantageous, however the book covers each step of a basic installation in good detail.

Areas Covered

The book is split into 9 chapters, aimed at covering a cradle to grave ‘basic’ vSphere installation.

  1. Installing and Configuring ESXi
  2. Installing and Using vCenter
  3. Networking
  4. Storage
  5. Resource Management and High Availability
  6. Managing Virtual Machines
  7. Securing the ESXi Server and Virtual Machines
  8. Performance Monitoring and Alerts
  9. vSphere update Manager

The book reads and flows well, with the explanations clear and concise. The author does a good job explaining all concepts covered in the book.

Final Thoughts

If you are a seasoned vSphere administrator/architect this book probably isn’t for you. Saying this, it does act as a handy reference if there are areas of vSphere that you aren’t familiar with that you need to review.  One thing I do like about this book, is all screenshots (where possible) are taken from  the vSphere Web Client. As many of us know, the Web Client will be the only way to manage VMware infrastructure in the not too distant future, therefore for the old skool folk like myself it also acts as a handy reference to help complete tasks in this manner.

Overall, I would say the author has done a great job in what they set out to do. Create a quick fire reference for vSphere administration tasks.

 

 

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