Upgrading vSphere from Nutanix Prism

Nutanix customers love the fact we give them their weekends back by having 1-click upgrades for the Acropolis operating system, BIOS, BMC, Firmware and the Hypervisor. When speaking to some customers still go through a multi-step process to include:

Download Updates in VUM
Create a new baseline
Attach Hosts to baseline and scan hosts to validate
Place DRS to manual and evacuate guests from the host
Issue shutdown command to CVM
Place host into maintenance mode
Proceed with remediation wizard
Complete upgrade
Reboot host
Power on CVM
Validate RF in Prism and move on

Yes, a couple of these steps are added compared to non-Nutanix environments, however there are still a number of steps that need to be completed.

With Prism, as long as the cluster is managed with vCenter, we are able to manage the entire process for you, by simply opening the upgrade tab, uploading the offline upgrade package with the json file from the Nutanix support portal and off you go! It’s as simple as that, and here’s another video to show the process.

Expanding a Nutanix Cluster

Number two in the video series……

One of the major appeals of Nutanix is pay as you grow economics. Start small and grow large, no forklift upgrades and having to forecast what your growth will be over the next ‘N’ years. Once you have your initial three node cluster, you can expand out your cluster at any time simply and non disruptively via Prism, you can even mix model types too to run different workloads in the same cluster. 

As you will have seen from the last video (if you haven’t it can be found here), foundation is now CVM based, therefore you can image nodes at the same time you expand out a cluster. Foundation will look at the baseline of the cluster (AOS version ‘X’ and Hypervisor version ‘Y’) and allow you to image a factory configured node to the same settings as your cluster and immediately add the capacity (storage and compute) to that cluster. This is the same regardless of adding a node or a block….

Here’s a video (sped up again) to show the process:

“The Times They are a Changin”

No, I’ve not gone crazy and plan on writing a blog on Bob Dylan, this post is still a tech focussed one.

After leaving university in 2003, I found my first job working for a mortgage company working in a team supporting the mortgage application software. After a few months, I managed to get promoted/transferred into the Server Support team. I was lucky in a sense to skip the usual progression of Helpdesk to Desktop Support to Server Support, but I grabbed this opportunity with both hands and started learning about Microsoft Server OS’s (primarily 2000 and some 2003 at the time if you are wondering), AD, Exchange, Citrix PS4, Firewalls, switches and a little known software product called VMware ESX 2.5. I’d like to say I was one of the early users of ESX 2.5, but I’d be exaggerating the truth, in fact I remember the more senior members of the team evaluating the software and discussing benefits, of which I had a little understanding of at the time. This was my first introduction into virtualisation.

The company was eventually bought out by Lehman Brothers, and rather than make the ‘Big Move to the City’ I took voluntary redundancy (a huge payday for me in those days) and spent a month having fun in Las Vegas, Amsterdam and Barcelona, before starting work the following month for a local reseller who were a big HP shop, Microsoft Gold Partner and VMware VAC (Authorised Consulting Partner). I started life here on the HelpDesk, which wasn’t a backward step as you may think, as it was providing 3rd line support for the reseller contractual customers, which involved support and administration of a wide variety of platforms including VMware. From here and over 5 years I progressed to a Technical Specialist focussed on Virtualisation and Shared Storage technologies (primarily VMware and Dell EqualLogic). I spent many hours speaking to customers about the benefits of virtualisation and countless hours in front of VMware Convertor progress bars. During this time, I started to understand really grasp the benefits virtualisation brings to the business world and evangelised the technology to many first timers. And at that time there were many.

As my knowledge and belief in virtualisation grew, I decided I wanted to move on to bigger and better projects at an enterprise level and start looking at other benefits aside from server virtualisation, such as private/public cloud, VDI and automation. Almost three years ago, I joined the consulting team at Xtravirt and was thrown straight into a 4K seat VDI deployment spanning EMEA. The past three years have seen me involved in some large VDI deployments as well as some big deployments with the vCloud stack.

It’s been an interesting journey to see how the term ‘Software-Defined’ is now more the focus extending virtualisation concepts across the technology stacks, not just compute. Vendors are now concentrating on making the entire datacenter Software-defined to make IT available as a service.

So, if you’re still reading this (which I hope you are), the reason for me writing the article is to announce that I’ll be leaving Xtravirt and joining Nutanix as a Systems Engineer on 21st October 2014. I’ve had the pleasure of working on a large scale VDI deployment over the last 7 months hosted on a Nutanix platform, the web-scale architecture and SDS (software-defined storage) approach Nutanix bring to the market genuinely excites me. This is a change of role for me moving into a product focussed pre-sales role, but when you truly believe in something, it makes the decision a much easier one.

My blog will still remain heavily focussed on the VMware side of things, however as I start to learn about Microsoft Hyper-V and KVM you may see some of that sneaking in too!

I’d like to thank Xtravirt for the past three years, and look forward to the future with Nutanix!